Category Archives: Management

The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable

From wiki:

The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable is a book on the black swan theory by epistemologist Nassim Nicholas Taleb, bestselling author of Fooled by Randomness.

A black swan is

  • a large-impact,
  • hard-to-predict, and
  • rare event beyond the realm of normal expectations.

Much of scientific discoveries for him are black swans – “undirected” and unpredicted. An event often referred to as a “black swan” is the September 11, 2001 attacks.

Bildungsphilister: a philistine with cosmetic, nongenuine culture. Nietzsche used this term to refer to the dogma-prone newspaper reader and opera lover with cosmetic exposure to culture and shallow depth. I extend it to the buzzword-using researcher in nonexperimental fields who lacks in imagination, curiosity, erudition, and culture and is closely centered on his ideas, on his “discipline.” This prevents him from seeing the conflicts between his ideas and the texture of the world.

Fooled by randomness: the general confusion between luck and determinism, which leads to a variety of superstitions with practical consequences, such as the belief that higher earnings in some professions are generated by skills when there is a significant component of luck in them.

Scorn of the abstract: favoring contextualized thinking over more abstract, though more relevant, matters. “The death of one child is a tragedy; the death of a million is a statistic.”

The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable – Nassim Nicholas Taleb – Books – Review – New York Times

How women altered the business landscape

Every day, she says, 420 women-owned businesses emerge in the United States and women-owned companies are creating jobs twice as fast as all other companies combined and pay more salaries than all of the Fortune 500 companies.

“Women’s companies are more likely than others to stay in business, while companies owned by women of color are four times as likely as others to stay in business,” Heffernan writes.

In “How She Does It,” Heffernan focuses on the stories of 26 women entrepreneurs and business executives to show why they went into business and why they have been so successful. They all had something to prove to themselves, she writes. Some thought that they had been undervalued by their employers.

They thought that a rejected idea had merit, that they were financially responsible, and that their ways of doing things could be as effective as the predominant macho styles.

“In this respect,” Heffernan writes, “women entrepreneurs remind me of a wave of immigrants: driven out of a land they found hostile, taking big risks in their determination to create a New World where they can succeed on their own terms. America was built by such pioneers and, today, its economy continues to be enriched by the fresh thinking of women who don’t accept defeat.”

Other factors besides the need to achieve and transcend gender stereotypes that propel the women featured in Heffernan’s book are:

  • A high capacity for empathy that contributes to zeitgeist, the intuitive ability to see ahead to the next need, trend, and potential opportunity.
  • A greater propensity for improvisation.
  • A leadership style that favors orchestration over command and control.
  • A greater emphasis on values than on profits.
  • A nurturing concern for the well-being of their employees.
How Women Entrepreneurs Are Changing the Rules of Business Success  

How She Does It: How Women Entrepreneurs Are Changing the Rules of Business Success by Margaret Heffernan

 
 
The Definitive Drucker  

The Definitive Drucker by Elizabeth Haas Edersheim

A Business Guide to Managing Policy, Public Relations, And Legal Issues  

Blog Rules: A Business Guide to Managing Policy, Public Relations, And Legal Issues by Nancy Flynn

How to Win the Hearts, Minds, and Business of Boomer Big Spenders  

PrimeTime Women: How to Win the Hearts, Minds, and Business of Boomer Big Spenders by Marti Barletta

It's Called Work for a Reason!: Your Success Is Your Own Damn Fault  

It’s Called Work for a Reason!: Your Success Is Your Own Damn Fault by Larry Winget

What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful  

What Got You Here Won’t Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful by Marshall Goldsmith and Mark Reiter

The Power of Being a Woman  

Fight Like a Girl: The Power of Being a Woman by Lisa Bevere